Friday, December 02, 2005

The Rovewellians Strike Again

Well said by the WaPo's editorial staff:
In hindsight, maybe it shouldn't be surprising that the Pentagon has been secretly paying Iraqi journalists and news organizations to write and run positive stories about the war. After all, this is an administration that paid a U.S. columnist and peddled phony video news releases at home, too. But saying it was predictable makes it no less loathsome and damaging to find that the Bush administration has treated the Iraqi press, the Iraqi people and the very idea of Iraqi democracy with even greater contempt.

Yep. And Pentagon public affairs is the outfit that tried to pull the wool over our eyes about Jessica Lynch and Pat Tillman.

But, heck, this is just another case of a few bad apples in the barrel, right?
From Jeff Gerth and Scott Shane of Arthur:
The military’s top commanders, including Gen. Peter Pace, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, did not know about the Lincoln Group contract until Wednesday, when it was first described by The Los Angeles Times, said a senior military official who was not authorized to speak publicly.
Pentagon officials said General Pace and other top officials were disturbed by the reported details of the propaganda campaign and demanded explanations from senior officers in Iraq, the official said.
When asked about the article Wednesday night on the ABC News program “Nightline,” General Pace said, “I would be concerned about anything that would be detrimental to the proper growth of democracy.”

Pace is a piece of work. Did you happen to catch him shucking and jiving about white phosphorous in the press conference with him and Rummy last week? If you missed it, here's the lowdown from BBC News:
[Pace] said white phosphorus, a chemical that burns on exposure to oxygen, producing a bright light and lots of white smoke, was used primarily to illuminate a battlefield or to hide troop movements.

"It is not a chemical weapon. It is an incendiary. And it is well within the law of war to use those weapons as they're being used, for marking and for screening," he said.

Pace must have forgotten that the Pentagon admitted to using white phosphorous to flush out insurgents in Fallujah last year in a tactic known as "shake and bake." How Pace classifies that as "marking and screening" is beyond me. He must have the latest copy of the Brave New World Dictionary. I understand Uncle Karl issues a new version to key administration officials every three months.


Not a single aspect of our information structure has escaped the invasion of black propaganda by this administration. Remember the Office of Strategic Information? Remember the White House Iraq Group? These outfits were straight out of Orwell's 1984.


Speaking of Orwell…

Judith Miller has put herself back in the news, apologizing for her pre-war stories about Iraq's WMD.
"I am obviously deeply chagrined that I ever write anything that turns out to be incorrect. I'm deeply sorry that the stories were wrong."

How sorry is she, really? She's not sorry that she was wrong.
"I'm deeply sorry our intelligence community got it wrong."

And those mean old intelligence weenies not only made poor Judy look bad.
"I am deeply sorry that the President was given a national intelligence estimate which concluded that Saddam Hussein had biological and chemical weapons and an active weapons program." "I am deeply sorry that the President was given a national intelligence estimate which concluded that Saddam Hussein had biological and chemical weapons and a active weapons program."

Does anybody else smell a "protect the President at all costs" propaganda program going on here?


Consider some of the stories flying around the infosphere about Mister Bush's relationships with his old stalwarts. This from Insight:
…the indictment and resignation of Lewis "Scooter" Libby marked the final straw in the deterioration of relations between President Bush and Mr. Cheney. They said Bush aides expect that any trial of Mr. Libby, Mr. Cheney's long-time chief of staff, would open a closet of skeletons regarding such issues as Iraq, the CIA and the conduct of White House aides.

"There's a lack of trust that the president has in Cheney and it's connected with Iraq," a source said.

The sources said Mr. Bush has privately blamed Mr. Cheney and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld for the U.S.-led war in Iraq. They said the president has told his senior aides that the vice president and defense secretary provided misleading assessments on Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, as well as the capabilities of the regime of Saddam Hussein.

What do you figure the odds are that these "sources" are leaking this "inside scoop" on their own initiatives? Is there a little fat bald man behind a curtain pulling strings and levers?

Consider this story from The Washington Note:
Barbara Bush is allegedly TICKED off at Dick Cheney, Karl Rove, Andy Card, nearly all of them -- except Karen Hughes -- for how her boy is faring in the hearts and minds of Americans.
The matriarch of the Bush clan is colder than North Pole ice right now to those around her son who she thinks have undermined him. I'll tell who my sources are if Patrick Fitzgerald gives a call and makes me -- but the sources are very close to Poppa Bush (41), who has been traveling a bit with some of his old entourage, including Brent Scowcroft and others of the first Bush regime.

Good old Mom, standing by her boy. Heck, how can anybody blame her little Georgie for anything that's gone wrong--he's only 59 years old!


  1. "He's only 59 years old." Priceless.

  2. Well then, next year he'll be 60 and no more excuses.

    Here's a bit of Friday political humor:

  3. Bill,

    I'm constantly amazed at how few folks want to place responsibility with the guy they actually elected.


    Yeah, next year! And the Onion piece is great.


  4. On Thom Hartman's radio show this morning..he played a snippet of the press conference that Pace and Rummy held yesterday.

    The snippet included Pace talking about what soldiers should do if they witness inhumane treatment (stop it from happening). Rumsfeld interjected and tried to correct Pace..saying that they shouldn't physically stop it...they should report it. And Pace corrected Rumsfeld back.

    It was quite the little exchange.

  5. Pace stood up to Rummy? Heck, maybe he's not just a recruiting poster male model after all.


    He was covering the boss's six.

  6. Yeah, it's interesting to see people falling on their own swords, or pushing others onto theirs, to protect W (and in Judy's case, to keep her book deal safe, too).

    There's about to be some more bad apples cleaned out before long. But they're the small ones.

    I'm most curious to see who's the Biggest Loser in the end in this game of Musical Fall Guy.

  7. "Musical Fall Guy." I like that.

    Pop Goes the Weasel. (Heh, heh.)

  8. General Pace may surprize you guys. I've seen a couple of his press conferences thus far, and he's one sharp mofo.

    Of course, if you didn't know - JCS is the end of the line for military guys. There isn't another billitt. His career is done after this stint.

    So, what's he got to lose? Rummy gunna try to bust him? LOL Fat fucking chance, he doesn't work for Rummy - he's only an advisor to Rummy. He works for Bush.

    Look for more solid go fuck yourself comments from General Pace to Rumsfeld. I am.

    Semper Fidelis

  9. BD,

    I'd like to think you'r right. But I don't think Pace got where he is by standing up to Rummy, not sure how much of it to expect now.

    We'll see.


  10. Pace didn't get to where he is by standing up to Rummy, but now that he's where he is, he sure is making a name for himself.

    I have a lot of sympathy for Pace in the same way that I have a lot of sympathy for Powell. (Does anyone remember that name, or is it too much a blast from the past?) He's in a situation in which he has to play the political bullshit games, and he's being called upon to support the orders that come down from the top. He's about as good and honest a military leader as one can hope for (in my limited estimation), and he's doing his job to the best of his ability.

    One thing he's NOT doing, however, is countermanding the law to which he is beholden. Military personell have a legal obligation to STOP if possible and REPORT absolutely any abuse or torture that they witness. When Rummy said that they didn't have the responsibility to stop abuse or torture, Pace corrected him, not because he wasn't toeing the party line, but because it was the truth about the law, and he wasn't going to go on record as having lied or misled anyone about it. He's no idiot.

    Let's face it: our average soldier or marine is not exactly the sharpest cookie in the box. (and yes, that was intentional) They tend to be well trained in their MOS, and they rely on others who are well trained in their own to give them directions on how to do things that aren't directly related to what they do. When they hear an ex-culpa from the Secretary of Defense saying that they aren't accountable to take action that the LAW SAYS that they must, they are being misled. More importantly, they are being misled about taking an action that could land them in military prison with a dishonorable discharge. If Rumsfeld wants to confuse the average soldier or marine by publically making the claim that it's a big grey area, rather than stating unequivocably that they have a moral, legal, and ethical responsibility to move heaven and earth to stop violations of international law, he's doing his soldiers, OUR soldiers, a disservice.

    Pace didn't let that happen.

  11. Sadiq,

    To a great extent, the four stars working under Rumsfeld are in much the same position as the four stars who worked under Johnson and McNamara.

    I have mixed feelings about all of them. They're in that bad spot where honor and duty collide head on.

    (If I haven't done so here before, let me strongly recommend the novel A Soldier's Duty by Thomas E. Ricks of the WaPo, which covers this subject admirably.)

  12. Speaking of novels, I just read for the first time "All Quiet on the Western Front." I enjoyed it immensely. It captures the senselessness of war perhaps as well as any novel I've read.

  13. Yeah, that's a great book, Scott.

  14. Hey Jeff:

    Did you see Murtha's reply to the Bush speech. You can find it here:

    (hope that link posts ok).

    The guy makes increasingly more sense to me.