Saturday, August 06, 2005

Will Anybody Listen?

A guy I never dreamt I'd agree with...

Over at HuffPo, Tom Hayden outlines an Iraq exit plan that sounds better than anything else I've seen--and a whole lot better than anything I've seen from the Bush administration.

"It is clear that the costs of our continued war and occupation are greater than any benefits," he writes. "We are all prisoners of this war."

Decide for yourself what you think of Tom's ten steps for resolving the conflict. Let me just note (once again) that what we're doing now isn't working, and the longer we stay on this course, the worse things will get, and the longer the "struggle" will last.

And whether you like Tom Hayden or not, good ideas are good ideas, regardless of where they originate.

8 comments:

  1. I agree Jeff, Hayden is on to something but is there really any chance the Bush regime would change their strategery?

    These are the guys Franlik had in mind when he said this:

    "The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results."

    By that standard this maladministration of tools and fools are certifiable.

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  2. That was Franklin, of course. ;)

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  3. Good old Ben, the guy knew what he was talking about. Compare the sanity of his adage with "stay the course."

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  4. Bush cannot admit mistakes and change course in Iraq. Dan Froomkin at the Washington Post said the Bush Administration is like a shark; if it stops moving it dies. They're constantly in attack mode against their critics because they have no valid defense for their incompetence and corruption.

    Karen

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  5. I think that's a perfect description, Karen.

    Jeff

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  6. Well, point one stopped me at once. You mean after all the blood and the billions, just walk away and wave good bye? Of course they have to get something for the trouble. It was a business driven war and until the venture begins to turn a profit it can't remain unsupervised. To say oops and walk away would be just as bad. It's like starting an operation on a sick patient, then changing your mind and closing him up having done nothing. As long as you got his belly wide open...Realistically "walk away" is not the best prescription once you become seriously involved. There are certain expectations that have been created in the minds of Iraqis that America has a moral obligation to fulfill at this point; security, order, freedom from brutality. Our best hope is to make some positive changes ancillary to the oil grab that was the impetus of this fiasco. And also hopefully share the oil profits between Iraqis, the US government and the US capitalists, in that order, in a 50/40/10 percentage. And here's a novel idea, how about giving soldiers stock in these oil companies that are going to profit (to be lost if they commit human rights violations). No one believes this war was a patriotic necessity anyway.

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  7. Renata,

    I don't really think Hayden is talking about "walking away" or not getting something out of our investment in that country. You may disagree, but I thought his point 9 covered this:

    "Negotiate for legitimate US interests. The peace envoy should negotiate all feasible assurances that the American troop withdrawal will be honored, that Americans will be eligible for reasonable allocations -- but not control -- of Iraqi oil resources, and that postwar Iraq will take effective steps against becoming a center for aggression against any other countries in the region."

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  8. Renata,
    I believe that corporations will plan for different outcomes when creating a business strategy. For example, a company introduces a new product for eternal youth, 10% of consumers end up developing permanent flatulence problems, how much do they need to spend for legal settlements, etc. :) Basically, they plan for success but they also plan for disaster.

    Karen

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